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Five agriculture projects approved in Mountain View County

All funded fencing projects are required to be wildlife friendly and landowners are provided with resources
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MOUNTAIN VIEW COUNTY - The county’s agricultural service board (ASB) has approved funding for five projects under the alternative land use services (ALUS)) program totalling more than $16,000.

The approvals came by way of motions at the board’s recent regularly scheduled meeting. The ASB is made up of appointed public members and county council.

• The board approved funding for 75 per cent of the materials for a dugout fencing project to a maximum of $618 and 25 per cent of the water system materials to a maximum of $2,341 on the Little Red Deer River watershed at NE 24-31-03-5. The board also approved $30 in annual payments for the maintenance of the project from the 2021 ALUS budget.

• The board approved funding for 25 per cent of the water system materials to a maximum of $1,868 on the Little Red Deer watershed at NE 14-31-03-5, and additionally $225 to annual payments.

• The board approved funding for 100 per cent of materials for a riparian fencing project to a maximum of $1,462 on the Little Red Deer watershed at NW 12-29-0405 and $735 to annual payments.

• The board approved funding for 100 per cent of the materials for a riparian fencing project to a maximum of $1,316 on a tributary of the Little Red Deer River at SE 19-33-03-5 and 25 per cent of the watering system materials to a maximum of $2,461 and additionally $465 to annual payments. 

• The board approved funding for 100 per cent of the materials for the riparian fencing project to a maximum of $2,250 and 100 per cent on a tributary of the Dogpound Creek at NW 02-32-04-5 and $2,640 to annual payments.

In 2021, four landowners have been approved for ALUS projects in the county impacting 76 acres of wetland, riparian and upland areas, with additional projects scheduled to be presented for approval consideration, members heard.

All funded fencing projects are required to be wildlife friendly and landowners are provided with resources, project funding through the Canadian Agricultural Partnership (CAP) program that recommends the bottom wire is higher than 16 inches and the top wire is lower that 60 inches to allow free passage of wildlife, administration said in a briefing note to the committee.

Board members also approved funding for an off-site watering system project on a tributary to the Beaverdam Creek at NE 36-29-03-5 for 25 per cent of the material costs to a maximum of $1,350 from the riparian and ecological enhancement program.

During the board’s recent meeting, Barbara Archibald, extension specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry updated members on the CAP program.

The program is a five-year, $3 billion federal-provincial-territorial investment in agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that began in 2018.

To date, the environmental stewardship and climate change CAP program has been well utilized by Mountain View County farmers with a total of $176,044 approved in funding for riparian management, manure and livestock facilities management, agricultural input, and waste management. 

The CAP grant application process has recently been simplified for producers and food manufacturers, with nine programs organized under three themes: growth and value added, farm efficiency, and public trust.

Members received her presentation as information.



Dan Singleton

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