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$50M Vietnam market opens doors to Canadian livestock

Vietnam will be the first Asian country to open its livestock market to Canadian ranchers since 2003, announced agriculture and trade ministers on Aug. 14 at Harvie Farms near Olds.

Vietnam will be the first Asian country to open its livestock market to Canadian ranchers since 2003, announced agriculture and trade ministers on Aug. 14 at Harvie Farms near Olds.Trade can resume immediately now that Vietnam's department of animal health has approved the Canadian export health certificates for live cattle, goats and sheep.The announcement from federal Agriculture Minster Gerry Ritz and International Trade Minister Ed Fast noted the Vietnamese market for imported ruminants represents roughly $50 million, which, if Canada fares well in competition with other markets, could lead to the first significant sale of Canadian live breeding animals (cattle, sheep, and goats) in eight years.ìOur government is focused on completing the economic recovery by opening new markets for Canadian goods and services,î Ritz said.Fast said the financial security of farmers and their families is often dependent on international trade, and the resumed trade with the Vietnamese market would affect that security positively, while creating job opportunities for Canadians.ìOur government wants to help them through freer trade and by securing access to new markets,î Fast said.ìThe achievement of this milestone is one more example of the effectiveness of the ongoing partnership between the Canadian government and industry.îIt's been four years since Canada formally requested access for all beef and cattle based on Canada's BSE controlled risk status (as determined by the World Organization for Animal Health) in June 2007.Vietnam banned imports of Canadian live cattle (along with beef and beef products) in May of 2003, upon the discovery that month of the first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Canada.According to Agriculture Canada, Vietnam regularly indicated it would approach the situation in phases, with expanded beef access first, followed by live cattle. Full access for Canadian beef was restored in July 2010.In addition to live breeding cattle, sheep and goats, Canada also has access for the following related products: all beef from animals of all ages; beef offal (heart, liver, and kidney); bovine semen; bovine embryos; ovine semen; ovine embryos; caprine semen; caprine embryos.Canadian exporters can find the required documentation on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) website at www.inspection.gc.ca.





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